English-Friendly Gynecologist Recommendation (Seoul): MediFlower

**This may go without saying but if you’re shy about the female body, I would read this post with caution.**

I recently heard some horror stories about foreign women who tried to go to a gynecologist in Seoul only to have the worst experience of their lives just trying to get a Pap smear. As they were virgins, apparently the doctor got upset and refused to perform the examination for fear of breaking their hymens–which, I’m sorry, any person with a college gen-ed level of sex education knows isn’t going to happen in that situation… So now these women are afraid to go to the gynecologist, which can be dangerous and should never have to happen.

Women’s health in South Korea is not prioritized unless the woman is pregnant. I found out that my Korean-aged-37 coworker has never once been to the gynecologist in her whole life. When I asked her why, she said because she was shy to show her parts to the doctor. Since I’m pretty sure my first genital examination was after getting my period at age 13 at the pediatrist’s office, I was shocked to hear this.

I began to research on the subject and found that in general, being seen as a single woman going into the gynecologist is a cultural taboo. I can’t exactly figure out why this would be except that the general public is ill informed about what the lady doctor actually does and just automatically assumes that gynecologists only exist to help a patient during pregnancy. This is highly disturbing to me, because it means that most sexually active women aren’t even getting screened for STD’s and certainly haven’t had ultrasounds or pap smears to check out their parts before.

I originally wanted to go to the gynecologist about three months ago (early June) to talk to her about birth control; since it was my first time to start it, I wanted to talk about my specific body and what would be best for it rather than going to the pharmacist to ask for a general brand. I also had kind of figured that most pharmacists just give out the mini-pill since most of my friends who received birth control from pharmacists showed me their packets and I didn’t want that for a variety of reasons. Anyway, I began to research for an English-friendly gynecologist in the Seoul region and somehow stumbled upon MediFlower Natural Birthing Center & Gynecology Clinic near Seoul National University of Education in Seocho.

I cannot recommend this place enough. The nurses were all extremely friendly, their English is (near if not) fluent, and the doctor (Dr. Rahyun Kim) was kind, patient, and informative. It was the exact opposite experience that I heard other people having at the international clinic, where one’s status of sexual activity decided their right to receive examination. When I asked about birth control options to control my out-of-control PMS symptoms and period pains, she recommended one for me that’s ended up working out quite well, and although she did ask me why I didn’t just go to the pharmacy to ask for it, when I explained that I’d wanted to talk to her about my exact symptoms she was very understanding. When I went through a phase of being freaked out about every little side effect she patiently explained why my fears were unnecessary and took time to explain to me in detail the effects of birth control on the body and how it actually works, because I’d never really heard it in detail before.

Additionally, recently I got a UTI/bladder infection that lasted for a long time so I was on some strong antibiotics given to me by the (male) urologist I’d decided to visit because his office is close to my school. As many of you women would be able to guess, I developed a yeast infection from the antibiotics and although I told my male doctor this, he neglected to provide me treatment for it. So I went back to Seocho and after about .2 seconds of inspecting my lady parts the doctor said calmly “I think you have a yeast infection,” inserted a vaginal tablet, wrote me a prescription for some topical cream and gave me a sympathetic smile as I ranted about the fact that the male urologist had just ignored me when I told him about it. I’d been in so much pain and discomfort that just hearing her confirm my suspicions (I’d never had a yeast infection before) relieved me so much I almost cried.

And because that bladder infection was quite persistent and I was on antibiotics for about a week after receiving that treatment, the yeast infection has come back and I have to go back there…but knowing I have somewhere to be listened to, cared about, and helped gives me a peace of mind; and after hearing about those other women’s horrible experiences, it makes me grateful that Mediflower exists and is easy to access.

No matter what kind of problem you’re having, if it concerns your “woman parts” I wholly recommend you search out MediFlower. They’re also open on Saturdays until 3PM for those of you who can’t make it there during the week.

Link to English site: http://mediflower.co.kr/eng/

Link to English-Speaking Staff page: http://mediflower.co.kr/eng/eng-staff/

Hours: http://mediflower.co.kr/eng/hours/

FAQ (insurance, IUD, what to bring the first time): http://mediflower.co.kr/eng/faq/#tab-id-1

Directions (from within Seoul): Take line 2 (Green) or line 3 (orange) to Gyo-dae Station (교대역). Also called “Seoul National University of Education” Station. Take exit 14 or 13 and walk straight for about 3 minutes. You’ll see a sign for the center in a building on the left. It’s on the second floor of a building called “Lotte Castle Medici.”

Address: 06634, 2nd Floor Lotte Castle Medici, 110 Seochojungang-Ro, Seocho-Gu, Seoul, South Korea (서울시 서초구 서초중앙로 110 롯데캐슬메디치 2층)

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “English-Friendly Gynecologist Recommendation (Seoul): MediFlower

  1. Thank you so much for all the useful information!
    I was wondering how you made your appointment as I can’t seem to find out where to contact them on their website.
    Thanks again!

    Jenna

    Like

    1. you can call them at 02-548-9400 and press 9 (i think) to be transferred to the “international clinic” ! sometimes there’s only one english-speaking nurse there; she may not be able to answer the first time you call so you may have to call a few times to get through. they also accept walk ins if you have the time to go and wait. the first time i went i was a walk in and it didn’t take too long!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s