Teacher Class

Every Wednesday afternoon various department teachers come to an English Speaking class, usually held in the meeting room beside the language department office. When I first started teaching and my coteacher told me I was going to have to teach other teachers, I was terrified. Although nobody had been unfriendly to me, the language barrier between adults is stronger and scarier, and at that time I was still envisioning a structured class time with lectures and grammar explanations…

During the first couple weeks we left applications open and about ten teachers applied. During the first class I lead a discussion about our hobbies and other introductions; all the teachers were friendly and better at English than I had expected. I was very relieved that it hadn’t been the ordeal I’d been imagining and after the first few classes I began to look forward every week to our 교사 수업.

A couple weeks ago some of the other teachers asked me if we could go outside to get a beer together during class time, so last Thursday (June 15th) we waited until work was over at 4.30 and went together to a chicken / beer restaurant between Gongdeok and Mapo station (and much closer to my home than I had realized).

I had hoped that I would get some photos of all of us together but after we’d had enough beers… we all forgot about that kind of thing. I did manage to get this shot of the Korean teacher who shares our Language dept. Office (who’s always giving me snacks and telling people I don’t eat enough) and the administration department teacher before I had my second beer and forgot about most things.

During the whole evening, teachers made an effort to speak English and we actually had great conversation. I’d been prepared with a discussion topic but we didn’t need it, since the alcohol loosened up everyone’s English. I taught them slang like “tipsy” and “lightweight” and they taught me some Korean in exchange–I spoke Korean in front of them for the first time (with the exception of Korean teacher with whom I regularly exchange snippets) and everyone was delighted, despite the fact that all I’d really done was translate words. They were surprised I knew things like 쟁이 and certain curse words, which was a little funny for me, because as a language student and also a language teacher it’s kind of always been a known to me that language learners gravitate to that kind of slang first, even as they’re forced to learn textbook, overly-formal and proper language.

As you’d know if you’ve been reading my posts, I’ve had a bit of a rough time of it lately. While usually I’m a light drinker and one beer is enough to get me pleasantly chatty and tipsy, I kind of downed my first giant beer and then couldn’t refuse when they ordered a second round… which I also finished. By that time I was speaking freely and at ease and about half the table understood me and the other half had phased out into a beer-headed stupor, but would nod and “ah” if I met their eyes while I was talking.

I don’t know what time it was, maybe 7 or 7.15, but most people decided to go home. The P.E. teacher, music teacher, and I decided to go out for a second round and on the way to the bar, they showed me some places I might want to see–cafes, shops, restaurants. I doubt that I would be able to figure out exactly where that place was again without asking how to get there, but we ended up in a little sul-jib (pub) with friendly staff and a cute atmosphere. When we’d been at the restaurant planning where to go, the PE teacher asked me what kind of style I liked, and sober me would have said it didn’t matter, but tipsy me said “a place with no old men.” They thought this was hilarious, and P.E. teacher said she knew a place. The pub we ended up at fit the bill. Gradually more and more crowded, but no old men.

We talked about anything from renting bicycles, to which mascara to use, to which gym to sign up for, and were there until maybe 9, when we decided to go walk to the Han River Park, which I had always known was quite close to my house but had never known how to get to. They showed me the entrance to the park and we walked along the river for a while, and then they walked with me back to my apartment.

After all the stress I’ve been dealing with it was nice to loosen up a little and get to know my coworkers better. This was also the first time many coworkers became aware that I can understand a good percentage of spoken Korean although my speaking skills are wimpy in comparison, so it was nice to interact with them a bit more like friends.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s